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: smiting goliath might as well be marshall ganz's job description. it began in mississippi's freedom summer of 1964 when his fury against injustice pulled him out of harvard and into the struggle for civil rights. from there, he signed on with the legendary cesar chavez and the united farm workers and for 16 years, struggled to unionize the men and women in the fields of california who toiled endless hours and mounting days, picking crops for next to nothing. three decades after marshall ganz had dropped out of harvard, he went back to finish his degree and earn a doctorate. a few years later, he was asked to become the architect behind the obama campaign's skillful organizing of students and volunteers. today, marshall ganz is a founder of the leading change network, a global community of organizers, educators and researchers mobilizing for democracy. you'll find more of his experience and philosophy in this book, "why david sometimes wins" marshall ganz, it's good to meet you. >> marshall ganz: it's good to meet you, bill. >> bill moyers: stories have been a powerful part of your life. wh
of us were arrested and jailed in mississippi during the freedom ride. a bus was set on fire in alabama. we were beaten and arrested and jailed, but we helped bring them in to segregation in public transportation. i came back here again in june of 196 1963 as the new chairmanf the student non-violent committee. we met with president kennedy, who said the frustration throughout america. in 1963 we cannot because of the color of our skin. we had t to pay a tax, pass a tt because of the color of our skin and pass a vote in jelly beans in a jar. thousand of people were arrested trying to participate in the integration process. many innocent were killed in mississippi, and that's why we told president kennedy we intended to march on washington to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in america. on august 28, 1963, the nation's capitol was in a state of emergency. thousands of troops surroundedded this city, little stores were closed, but the march was so orderly, so peaceful it was filled with dignity and self-respect because we believe in a way of peace, the way of l
, who recently had some heart treatment. let's go to mississippi. laura from ocean springs, mississippi. i am 45 years old. when barack obama talked about education. they discussed how blacks and whites could not go to the same school. thes a graduate from university of south alabama. i was able to graduate from there with a bachelors. >> what did you get your degree in? >> i got my degree in exercise science. work on atrying to masters, but i have been sick. i will have surgery in september. i will try to finish up with a masters in education. >> good luck to you, thank you for joining us. florida, next up. >> how are you doing? listen, i wanted to commend you guys and congratulate you for an awesome broadcast. such a remarkable speech by such a remarkable character. encourage.mber to some of the members of congress commenting about the days activities. here here is senator casey from pennsylvania. this is kay granger of texas. what dreams do you have for your country? the culmination of a movement that began here in montgomery 50 years before. here is california, good evening, stephen
picky about where it breeds. >> all 100 of those frogs are here, in mississippi. >> it was only one breeding pond known to exist, which was in harrison county, mississippi, and it had not been seen in louisiana since 1967. people kind of laughed, that frog is way over in mississippi, they've seen him, how did he swim across three rivers, cross three interstates and end up over here. >> the designated land in louisiana is privately owned and has been in one family for generations. >> it's land that my family has owned for well over 100 jeers, it's an actively managed tree farm. my great grandfather started a lumber company after the civil war. he built a lumber railroad in these areas in order to bring the timber down. we are standing right now in the middle of an area of about 1500 acres the fish and wildlife service has certified is a critical habitat for frogs that have not been here for many, many years, the frogs need certain elements to live. one of them is a pond. the fish and wildlife service says this is one of these ponds. now it renders his land worthless to potential deve
28th, 1955, emmett till was dragged from his cousin's home in mississippi and lynched. that lynching was part of what launched a civil rights movement. in 1963 on august 28th, dr. king stood and articulated a dream for the nation. on august 28th, 2008, president obama or then senator obama stood and accepted the nomination of the democratic party for the u.s. presidency. today, he will speak to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the march. from that lynching on august 28th to this moment of an african-american president on august 28th, there have been real accomplishments. there have been real changes. we have to acknowledge that, in fact, we have made progress as a country. at the same time, that we must absolutely recognize the continuing structural barriers that exist in terms of economic inequality, unfairness in the workplace, lack of opportunity in housing, often lack of opportunity in education from k through 12, as well as in higher education, and, of course, the realities of continuing residential segregation that impact everything from our health to our opportunities to ge
that hillary cited her speech and she did cite examples were in the south, mississippi, texas, florida, south carolina. she is suggesting that since 1965 and 2013 the white people in the south are irrevocably racist and cannot be trusted. half of the country below the mason-dixon line still cannot be trusted and this is a person who wants to be president of the entire united states and this is the basis on which she's going to run to turn out as jason suggested, black voter turnout. in 2005 the federal election reform commission headed by jimmy carter and former secretary of state jim baker said that voter i. dchlt laws should be promoted because they will enfranchise black voters. she's suggesting that no one could possibly disagree with her. well, serious people do disagree with her on this. >> let me ask a political question, jason. what is the benefit for republicans pushing -- that's what they're doing -- a lot of these states are pushing this are republicans. not universally, but in north carolina the government flipped. the republicans pushed some of these laws. are they getting much o
'm a mississippi segragist and i'm proud of it. >> reporter: as the south resisted integration, president john f. kennedy grew frustrated, nelson says the president wanted to help blacks but also wanted to appease southern voters. >> the kennedys were sort of behind it but not really. i mean lip service was there. >> reporter: throughout that summer more than 300 freedom riders traveled through the deep south. in september the president's brother attorney general robert kennedy asked for and received more stringent regulations. by the end of 61, public transportation throughout the south was integrated. >> after the violent response to the freedom riders, president kennedy sent a bill to congress. he talked to the nation about why it should pass. >> now the time has come for this nation to fulfill its promise. the events in berming ham and elsewhere have so increased that cries for equality that no city or state or legislative body can choose to ignore them. the fires of frustration and discord are burning in every city. in demonstrations, parades and protests. which create tension and threaten
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capitol hill itself, until all of the residents of the very seat of our
antecedence in the first black boy who was assassinated in mississippi in 1955 for allegedly violating racial adequate and speaking to a white woman. her body was placed in the tallahassee river with the 25 -- nugent. it was shown in jet magazine and that spurred the nation to look at the price of white supremacy on our democracy. when you think about 1963, 1963 is the year of birmingham and the year dr. king writes his famous letter from a birmingham jail and in that letter dr. king said the activism going on in birmingham and the young women and men being arrested sometimes as young as 8, 9, 10 years old are taking this nation back to those great wells of democracy dug deep by the founding fathers. king was being kind because the country was founded on racial slavery. a conversation that we still have not had but 50 years ago with the march on washington provided, a litmus test for american democracy. when canes speaks at the march on washington on august 28, 1963, he says americans of all colors and all races are going to have to struggle together, go to jail together to try to fundamental
the mississippi. >> sort of. >> rose: to memphis, or somewhere. >> well, i can't explain it. this is just music that touched me from the very first moment i heard it. i was very, very young, and i believe it was a willy dixon record, but i'm not sure. but i heard this sound, this sort of wonderful sliver of light broke through between a minor third and a major third-- and i later investigated what that actually means. i didn't even know it at the time. and i just-- it made me shiver. it was almost like an electric shock. and i realized this is where i wanted to live. i wanted to be in that space and hear these sounds and these stories knowing, of course, that i'm monumentally unsuited for the task. you know, i'm not from here. this is not my music. >> rose: before we talk about "house," where did you grow up? >> i grew up in ox horde, england, home of the blues-- it's not the home of the blues. ( laughs (. >> rose: maybe oxford, mississippi. >> yes, i grew up in oxford. >> rose: your dad was-- >> he was a doctor. >> rose: your moment? >> she was-- she raised four children. >> rose: of which you
on the death list in mississippi and he took it upon himself to train our children what to do in case they heard gunfire. that's exactly what they did that night. each other helped each other to the bathroom to get in the tub and my screams stopped them from completing that hiding point. but we knew, you live with death threats constantly and you adapt your life to that. you might argue, but you don't leave without the embrace. you might become angry with things that are happening around you, but it's a time of support. it's a time of pulling people together. and during that time, we had the ages divided. there were the young people and there were the older people. those in the middle were more or less teachers who were a little afraid to speak up and stand out. medgarr stood alone in that battle. he did have supporters, of course, but he was the point person and it was extremely difficult for us as a family to live with that. but you lived as though every day was going to be your last together. it sounds a little sad but that's the way it was. >> one of your themes in your speech on
, mississippi. and many may relate to that. the death of those three civil rights workers there. but you also relate the fact that there was many others all across the great state of mississippi and in other southern states who sacrificed as well. and so share some of your opinions on the ideal of galvanizing the college youth. >> we followed the tradition as college students of young people and college students all over the world. when you talk about changing the social order, it is usually the young people, the young, educated people who will generally spear that particular change. -- spearhead that particular change. so we followed that same historical tradition. when, we know about the three civil rights workers who were murdered, but during that same period from june, i think, through september a total of 7 other blacks -- 27 other blacks, young black males, were murdered in mississippi. i related the you the story of two students at alcorn college who were just coming back to the campus from downtown, and two carloads of klansmen kidnapped them, and they found be their bodies, i think,
meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your remember? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to member of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talked about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equatable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we thought we were more militant than
and jailed in mississippi during the freedom ride. our bus was set on four in alabama. we were beaten and arrested and jailed. but we helped bring an end to segregation in public transportation. i came back here again in june of 1963 with the big six as the new chairman of the student nonviolent coordinating committee. we met with president kennedy. in 1963 -- we had to pay a poll tax, pass a so-called literacy test. count the number of jelly beans in a jar. hundreds of thousands of people were arrested and jailed throughout the south in trying to participate in the democratic process. that's why we told president kennedy we intended to march on washington. to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in america. on august 28th, 1963, the nation's capital was in a state of emergency. thousands of troops surrounded the city. liquor stores were closed. residents were told to stay home that day. but the march was so orderly, so peaceful. it was filled with dignity and self-respect. because we believe in the way of peace, the way of love, the way of nonviolence. people
against civil rights. the state of mississippi, which had given fdr something like 95% of the vote gave goldwater 84% in 1964, the guy who participated in the filibuster. >> then the voting rights act of '65 was so important because that changed the face of government in the united states. just like you may have handed the south over to the gop for all those decades, but you really changed -- you changed the united states of america, you know, i think as a result of the better. >> he might have changed party labels but we need to understand that, you know, racism is racism, no matter if it's a democrat or republican. so, the notion that he signed the party away for 30 years, you know, brings me back to the moment of, what's your responsibility of the civil rights leader? that that was a political calculation that lindyn lyndon made. so, yes, this may cost the democratic party, but eventually we believe it's going to benefit the nation. that's where we are today. >> it is interesting -- what it really did, we say it signed the south away for democrats. in a lot of ways it did. but it sor
of the eight states that are highest were louisiana, mississippi, states like this. one of the things that's interesting to me is the states that ended up lowest on the list were not the most liberal or coals mott policy tan. they were the whitest states, like north dakota, idaho, and northern new england. so there's this just lingering craziness that still exist it is out there. obviously there's a tactics to the take on votes rights, but we also have to consider the possibility and i think the president is sort of considering this that we're a bit more racist than we like to think. >> we're here in new york city where the stop-and-frisk, the fact that the judge sheindlin has rule that stop and frisk is unconstitutional, hats given rights to a huge debate about whether people of color truly are treated equally. you have mayor bloomberg say this policy is good for minority communities and you have a judge who says it's unstill independents and african-americans have been saying for decades that profiling is wrong and feels wrong, and it reduces -- there's been this unwillingness to tackle
. , james is ini ocean springs, and he supports same-sex marriage. >> yes, and mississippi, of .ourse, does not recognize i am originally from louisiana, and it is not recognized. but just like all other civil progress, the south as far behind. it will take some time to reach it, but we will eventually get there. lived inng have you mississippi? >> just over a year. of the time i spent in louisiana and i lived in baileys, central america, for the last five years before e,ming to mississippi -- beliz central america, for the last five years before coming to mississippi. >> mark, go ahead with your comment. thismain point to all of is, we live in a great country and everybody has the right to be wrong. everybody has the right to be right. what we have here is a battle over semantics, i think. can be think the union called marriage because marriage is a sacrament. it is sacred. it is holy. , a homosexual marriage, is sodomy. that is not holy. that is an unholy union. if you want to go ahead and have the government take care of all of your finances and everything after you die, then call it som
think it's like meals on wheels. you take big issues like social security. in rural areas of mississippi and alabama where there are a lot of poor people of both backgrounds black and white, they aren't on plantations. these are workers. and they really care about these basic social programs. and yet obama fights for them and they don't ally with them. >> they don't. and they think they will be better off on their own. >> i know you're friends with bill cosby and i in ways worship the guy. here's when the president didn't get away from delivering a tough message. he didn't sound like the lefty socialist his critics on the right portray him as. here he is. >> if we're honest with ourselves, we'll admit that during the course of 50 years, there were times when some of us claiming to push for change lost our way. the anguish of assassinations set off self-defeating riots. legitimate grievances against police brutality tipped into excuse making for criminal behavior. and what had once been a call for equality of opportunity, the chance for all americans to work hard and get ahead was too oft
lou in greenwood, mississippi, james orange an activist in birmingham, alabama. jose williams. i thought of those people, i thought of baker, and so when i thought of them, i began to cry. i began to cry, because i knew that there contribution had changed america, by the way, i said this directly to the president of the united states. i reminded him yesterday when i had the honor to see him in the reception, even when he was out in california. i -- and you know, he knows this, that when he was elected, for example and there were several people at a faculty home celebrating the election of barack obama. and people in the room started to cry, and someone said to me, professor jones, did you think you live long enough to see an african-american elected president? i said no. but excuse me, my tears are not for the election of barack obama's president. my tears are for all of those persons that i personally knew, personally knew -- i called them wintertime soldiers, who made his election possible. and the president today and even earlier, he reflected that in the very poignant and mov
in meridian, mississippi in an integrated school. and went to school at university of alabama at a very integrated campus and at a campus that in the 1980s was actually handling racial issues a lot better than a lot of campuses across the northeast. but martin luther king not only did for america but what he did for his home region of the south, a region that had been scarred by racism and racial tensions for years. to see how quickly things -- he gave this speech the year i was born in a segregated south and segregated america. by the time i started first grade in meridian mississippi it w was integrated. that is nothing short of extraordinary and that is a legacy that we put first at the feet of martin luther king and also all the civil rights workers and protesters and leaders who gave their all to make sure that white children like myself and black children who were my friends, who i played football with in first grade and baseball with in first grade, would go to school together. that was the normal. that was normal for me. let me -- al, let me go to you quickly here. it is incredi
/rural divide and when you look at the whites in a state like mississippi and alabama and exit polls last year and 2008 as well, 90%-plus for romney and the voting in the states is basically black, democratic and white, republican. that is what it is down there. >> and part of that is that the democrats have not shown up and made our arguments in the south. that is a big, and the southern progress fund that is part of what they are trying to rectify. if all you hear is vitriol that is on one side of the argument, and if we are not there. alvin greene was our candidate for senate in south carolina, and people say, it is pointless and we will never win, and my point is just that we are never going to effect change if we are not there to at least make the case and show something different. >> that is the legacy of redistricting, too, because the democrats no longer feel they have to campaign or spread a moderate progressive message in that part of the country. and michael, this information is coming to day after the president was in arizona and had protesters outside of one of his speeches singin
out dirt farmers all over the midwest and the mississippi valley handing them one-way tickets to the vehicle city as flint nicknamed itself. the newcomers slept in shacks, tents and railroad cars. earl's family rented a tiny house, all he could afford on his factory pay. after the war earl tried farming again, failed again and returned to flint for good. everett grew up a city boy with no agricultural ambitions. after graduating from high school in 1933, he enlisted in general motors as an apprentice tool and dye maker at 50 cents an hour. the job could disappear in a day. if a supervisor wanted to hire his brother-in-law, he created ap opening by handing a worker a yellow slip, the color of termination. bachelors were laid off while married men with lower seniority kept their jobs. the supervision, they had no control either, everett recalled. you could come in today and have a desk and have a yellow slip on there that said you're all done. on november 12th, three welders conducted a short pro-union sit-down demonstration. in protest, a department in the plant stopped working
's day that bridge collapsed in the middle of the mississippi river. as i said, that day, a bridge just shouldn't fall down in the middle of america. not an eight-lane bridge in the middle of rush hour and not a bridge six blocks from my house. that's what happened. 13 people were killed. hundreds were injured. you know what we do when it does break down, when that happens in america? we rebuild. we rebuilt that bridge less than 13 months. we rebuilt like they're rebuilding in new jersey after hurricane sandy. we rebuild like you did in iowa after the iowa floods. we rebuild because that's what a good government does. it funds public safety and infrastructure and it doesn't shortchange our roads and our bridges and our locks and our dams. so where do you think the senate passed bipartisan water bill, the water resources development act. where do you think it is? it's is it you can in the house of representatives another example. after decades of immigrants living in the shadows, kids who lived in our military denied citizenship. engineers and doctors and scientists denied industry. the
south carolina tonight. plenty hot in nashville, for mississippi and vanderbilt. up to 91 in honolulu where hawaii plans to knock off southern california. that was a very well-written weather college football -- >> it was. i feel like i know what's going on in weather and college football now. >> who did that, jack? >> had to be jack. kudos to jack! round of applause. [ applause ] from all of us. >>> while we're on the sports theme, let's go to the u.s. open where venus williams its out! >> she battled and battled again in a marathon match against her opponent from china. went all the way to third set, tiebreaker. williams came up just short. this is the third year in a row, williams exited the singles tournament after two rounds. she's also playing doubles with her sister serena. >> before you think the tournament is totally serious. check out a lighter moment there. check that out. it happened during the women's first round match, briefly delayed by the squirrel. unwanted visitor took its time getting off the court as well. eventually tucked in behind a scoreboard. never to be seen
, now until september 3rd. that's the power of german engineering. >>> february 25th, 1870 mississippi became the first ever african-american sworn into the united states senate. revels was elected by the mississippi state legislative the reconstruction era and was only given his seat after a heated debate among senators. "new york times" story from that day. the colored member admitted to his seat in the senate. here's how the "times" described the scene in the senate chamber that day. the ceremony was short. his demeanor was as dignified as to be expected under the circumstances. the abuse poured upon him and during his race over the last two days may have shaken the nerves of anyone. the vast throng in the gallery showed no signs of feeling one way or the other and left very quietly. >>> now, contrast that with the scene in newark this past tuesday night when cory booker came closer to joining the senate with a blowout in the democratic primary. >> it is such an honor to be your nominee, to be your democratic nominee for the united states senate. thank you! >> here's the thing. betw
of emmett till and he is talking about the deaths of two other organizers in mississippi who would try to register to vote and have been killed and she is angry and she is sad and she is despairing because she came to that night having spent more than a decade organizing around cases like this and what was particularly sort of exciting about this case was there have been enough organizing and enough awareness that there had been a trial and yet still the two killers go free. and i wanted to start there because i think many people would have made the comparison between the lynching of emmett till and trayvon martin, but i think we can go deeper in that comparison and to think about that comparison not just as a comparison of sadness and of anger but of what follows. because i know all of you know what's going to happen four days later on december 1, 1955 and that is rosa parks who has spent two decades organizing. she begins her adult political life around around the scottsboro case in spent the past decade turning it into a more activist branch and so she comes to december 1, 1955 with
of the lynching of emmitt till in mississippi. the official name of the march was march on washington for freedom. it was to call out the economic inequality and social restrictions faced by black americans in the south and in the north. it was also not dr. king's march. he was one of several speakers scheduled to be on the dais that day. the speech that martin luther king, jr. planned to deliver that day was not his dream for america. it was an accuse jays. king's speech accused the country and its leaders of handing the negro a bad check. on economic advancement, access to public spaces, education and jobs. it was only when king went off script that he spoke of his dream and gave the world the lines that have come to define him in history. after the march, king, randolph and the other leaders gathered at the white house. and kennedy reportedly lined into king and smiled saying, i have a dream. three months later kennedy was did. the following july the civil rights bill that 250,000 people marched for was passed. when we commemorate the march on washington next weekend it will be that dream and
, mississippi, marie, democratic caller in mississippi. the future of the democratic arty at this point, hiller -- hillary clinton is the sole standing. who she will take with her, that is questionable. she does not have much of a selection to choose from. after listening to her speech at the bar, it just reminded everyone how skilled she is. she is a lawyer. she understands constitutional law in this country as well as the national law. she's the best qualified in able to skills of being negotiate. it is the travesty of what happened in benghazi that i think it was very unprofessional and very undemocratic how the republican party tried to paint it is a very dangerous thing. some people do not want to have a military state in terms of how they run the embassies. it's very unfortunate that it but that is how the international goes. sabotaging the voting rights act, sabotaging the affordable health care act, making it look like something that it is when it isn't, everyone should be able to have health care. i don't know how many people can remember, but there was a time when you could not he den
into mississippi, it was pretty horrible. it was not all blamed on sherman. it was the collapse of the cotton market. the english went to india, egypt for cotton the last few years of the blockade, it broke them. 6000 union soldiers elected to settle in new orleans. it was not all like "gone with the wind." it was coming back, but it was a different culture. it would not be agricultural. it would not have that until later in the 19th century. host: the north was in the midst of a great big industrial revolution. the days of the big financiers on wall street. tell us about what was happening there. guest: thanks in part to the machinery of war. guest: it was a continuation of the war and an expansion, and they were getting ready for the centennial of the nation and showing off the advances that had been made in the past 100 years. most of those were technological advances, the old farming equipment to the new modern technology, transcontinental railroad, transportation was bringing people closer together, making it much easier to get cross-country. host: here are a few of the big things that h
in mississippi -- on instagramcture of the folks coming into that town hall in mississippi. also this evening, john boehner is holding a conference call with republicans. politico reports on that. the headline -- they write the republican leadership hold a conference this evening. topics expected to be discussed include immigration reform legislation, government funding and the debt ceiling, and those issues are expected to be top priorities in the fall. they said conference calls of this nature are typical house has an out of session for three weeks. they will be back in session in september. pennsylvania, republican line. caller: hi. my son is a student going to college. he is going to a private college. my husband and i are both middle-class americans. i am a teacher. the costs are daunting. done withe he is inool completely, $250,000 loans. he wants to be an orthopedic surgeon. >> right. caller: of course you when you talk to move ahead and break those barriers. foret a bill in the mail 30,000 something dollars every few months. loans is he taking on himself and how much are you and your
by the church in philadelphia, mississippi, a worker from boston was beaten to death. the day of this demonstration we have six people shot in washington the same day. black americans right now, young people, we lose 3000 every six months. we have a 9/11 every six months. over 4000 died in 40 years of lynching. we could lose more than that in one year. the priorities that we have are not racism. just because i say that i need tires for my car, my mother gots heart surgery, we have to establish priorities. because i spend my resources helping my mother does not mean i do not need tires. the challenge we face is we are going to give voice to the least of all its children as a measure of our effectiveness and leadership? [applause] the answers will come by going sufferingommunities of problem, and finding out not from the 70% of the households that are raising children, dropping out, but what is happening in the 30% of the households of the people who are not dropping out of school, in jail, on drugs. we just rolled a young lady in going toin teske, college, and for years she has
over the mississippi river, 16 feet more to go. i could watch this go down the nation's greatest river. it was an awesome view. the people that we serve know that we need to build the next great bridges and maintain the futures that all americans drive on. we're tremendously honored. we want to hear from our first guest here, congressman bill shuster. he oversees house action on all the transportation including maritime, highway, mass transit, and railroad. he represents pennsylvania's ninth congressional district and has searched on the committee since his first election to congress in 2000 one. welcome. >> thank you very much. thanks for that great example that i can take back to washington as to how the parties can work together. we need a good example. i really appreciate the opportunity to be here. at every state i have been to this is my first visit to wisconsin. penn state is going to prevail this year. i look at a couple of other governors. we look forward to those engagements. it is an opportunity for me to engage with governors. as i have traveled around the coeeg what other
martin is the 14-year-old black belt that was assassinated in the middle of mississippi in 1985 for allegedly violating racial etiquette and speaking to a white woman. his body was placed in the tallahassee river with a 125 lb coffin jindal tied around his neck. it was shown in the jet magazine and that spurred the nation to look at the price of white supremacy on our dhaka see. we think about 1963, 1963 is the year of birmingham and the year dr. king writes his famous letter from the jail. dr. king says the activism that has gone on the end of the young women and men in that are being addressed it sometimes as eight, naim, 10-years-old are taking the nation back to the democracy that was dug deep by the founding fathers. he was being too kind because the country was founded on racial slavery and it is a conversation that we still have not had. about 50 years ago with the march on washington provided a litmus test for democracy. when he speaks of the march on washington she says americans of all cultures and races have to struggle together and go to jail together to try to funda
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